Issue weight (GitLab)

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One of the features of the Agile planning add-on, is the functionality to add weight to issues.

You can enter any integer positive non-zero value {1, 2, ...}. Values cannot be restricted to a previously created population for this dropbox.

Decide what to use it for...

GitLabs doesn't prescribe any specific usage. With other words: You have to decide for yourself what you want to use it for - If you want to use it at all, of course.

Some things that it could be used for (and yes, those terms overlap - don't try to figure it out):

Development; input

  • Complexity
  • Effort
  • Time

Planning

  • Criticality
  • Impact
  • Importance
  • Priority
  • Urgency
  • Value

Or maybe not?

When checking out burndown- & burnup charts within GitLab, you might notice that one metric to display these graphics by, is actually issue weight , with the other option being issue count, so maybe it does make sense to use issue weight for the 'traditional' measurement of effort or something like that, rather than for importance or something like that.

Example: Importance + time estimate

Kyle Gregory:

  • Product Owner uses weight to assign importance
  • Developers (probably during sprint planning or backlog refinement) together as a group, assign time estimates using /estimate
  • Focus on the items with a high weight/estimate ratio + low time estimate.
Example: Use importance (weight) + time estimate to establish priorities
# Description Importance Time or effort
estimate
Ratio
importance/effort
Prio Notes
1 A simple bug that completely breaks your product for some users High Low High 1 Easy: High importance, impact or weight + low time estimate
2 A new feature that many users are clamoring for High High Medium 3
3 A simple bug that is a minor nuisance for some users Low Low Medium 2 Both #2 and #3 have a medium ratio, but #2 takes less time
4 A complex issue that is a minor nuisance for some users Low High Low 4

See also

Sources